#ASKTWICE

You’re just about to enter a classroom…

The teacher asks if everyone is okay.

They all respond “yes” (you’re not)

 

You’re walking down the road and I see a someone I went to school with…

They say “alright?”

You respond “alright?” (you don’t know what else to say)

 

Your best friend drops me a message…

They say “are you okay?”

You say “I’m fine.”

They say “are you actually fine?”

I say “no” … (a conversation begins)

 

It’s very common for us as people to not answer truthfully when someone says “are you okay?” because we are worried, worried we are going to take up too much time, or worried that people don’t really care.

We are so prone to just throwing the question back at someone rather than answering it ourselves, or just saying “I’m fine” as to not cause a fuss. This isn’t only common with people with mental health issues, it’s common with everyone, and it can be dangerous.

Those with mental health issues, however, may feel like even more of a burden when it comes to talking about how they’re feeling, due to the stigma attached,  so they’re inclined to say they’re fine. They may not feel people are interested or care and that it is the socially acceptable thing to do to say that they’re okay.

This needs to change.

A conversation can save a life, and it often starts with a question.

If you don’t think something is quite right, then ASK TWICE.

Follow Time to change on social media to keep up with the campaign, also the hashtag #AskTwice